Using the Turkey Carcass to Make Stock

I am all about finding ways to save money so utilizing every part of a meal is important to me. Which is why this confession is a bit embarrassing. I have never before boiled up the turkey carcass to make stock. That is until now. Now that I think about it all these years has been such a waste throwing it away and the broth can be used to make a wonderful soup for the cold winter days or used in any recipe calling for stock. I am going to be using some of mine in a risotto tonight. To give it a gorgeous golden colour you need to use onions that still have the skins on them. I didn’t do that this time because in the spirit of using up leftovers I had 6 onions that needed to be used that had been sliced for my attempt to make my own fried onions for my green bean casserole. Needless to say with all the work that needed to be done for my meal I decided this was a bit of an ambitious thing to try to do. So the colour of my stock wasn’t what I would have liked but the flavour was nice and strong and I am looking forward to the dishes and soup I am going to create with it.

What is your favourite soup that you would make with this gorgeous stock?

Turkey Stock

1 turkey carcass
4 Lt. (16 c.) cold water
2 large carrots, chopped
2 onions, quartered (do NOT peel)
1 Tbsp crushed peppercorn
2 tsp dried thyme
2 tsp dried parsley
2 tsp garlic powder


Strip the turkey carcass of all its meat. The turkey will need to be broken down so it can fit into your large pot so don’t be delicate. Breaking into the carcass will also help you find places where meat has been hiding all this time, again more food that previously had been wasted.

Once you have most of the turkey meat stripped off the bones go ahead and finish break up the bones and put them into a large pot; also put in the pot any turkey skin and all the other assorted “bits” that aren’t edible meat. I go ahead and throw in the turkey neck, heart and other bits seeing as how I don’t use this normally. When you have the pot full of bones, pour the cold water over and turn heat to high; bring to a boil.

Chop up the carrots and onions; make sure to leave the onion skin ON as it gives your stock a lovely rich colour. When the stock comes to a boil, add all remaining ingredients and turn heat down to a lightly bubbling simmer.

Simmer for 3 to 4 hours, stirring every once in a while. Until the broth has boiled down to half of its liquid, about 2 Lt. (8 c.)

Once the stock is ready, strain it through a fine-meshed sieve into a large bowl; if your sieve is not fine, line it first with cheesecloth; discard the bones and veggies you used to make the stock.

Refrigerate stock, covered, for several hours or preferably overnight; until the stock has congealed. Skim off the solidified fat before you either make soup or freeze the stock. Because the stock is congealed I find it is easy to just cut the stock into cubes and divide into 2 bags to freeze. Or you can go ahead and make soup right away.
Turkey Stock
Author: 
 

Using up the turkey carcass for homemade stock
Ingredients
  • 1 turkey carcass
  • 4 Lt. (16 c.) cold water
  • 2 large carrots, chopped
  • 2 onions, quartered (do NOT peel)
  • 1 Tbsp crushed peppercorn
  • 2 tsp dried thyme
  • 2 tsp dried parsley
  • 2 tsp garlic powder

Instructions
  1. Strip the turkey carcass of all its meat. The turkey will need to be broken down so it can fit into your large pot so don’t be delicate. Breaking into the carcass will also help you find places where meat has been hiding all this time, again more food that previously had been wasted.
  2. Once you have most of the turkey meat stripped off the bones go ahead and finish break up the bones and put them into a large pot; also put in the pot any turkey skin and all the other assorted “bits” that aren’t edible meat. I go ahead and throw in the turkey neck, heart and other bits seeing as how I don’t use this normally.
  3. When you have the pot full of bones, pour the cold water over and turn heat to high; bring to a boil.
  4. Chop up the carrots and onions; make sure to leave the onion skin ON as it gives your stock a lovely rich colour.
  5. When the stock comes to a boil, add all remaining ingredients and turn heat down to a lightly bubbling simmer.
  6. Simmer for 3 to 4 hours, stirring every once in a while. Until the broth has boiled down to half of its liquid, about 2 Lt. (8 c.)
  7. Once the stock is ready, strain it through a fine-meshed sieve into a large bowl; if your sieve is not fine, line it first with cheesecloth; discard the bones and veggies you used to make the stock.
  8. Refrigerate stock, covered, for several hours or preferably overnight; until the stock has congealed. Skim off the solidified fat before you either make soup or freeze the stock.
  9. Because the stock is congealed I find it is easy to just cut the stock into cubes to put in a bad and divide into 2 bags to freeze. Or you can go ahead and make soup right away.

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2 Responses to Using the Turkey Carcass to Make Stock

  1. terry t says:

    I was taught to cook by my Grandmother who lived thru the Depression. I have used turkey carcasses as well as all chicken bones forever to make stock. I do take it one very frugal step further tho. I save all of my carrot and celery ends and onion ends and skins in the freezer until I’m ready to make a pot of stock. I use my pressure cooker. It turns out fabulous! I absolutely hate to use store bought stock – rather spoiled by the home made stuff! which is basically free!

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